About

The Chapter

The St. John’s, NL Chapter of the Canadian Celiac Association provides support and education to individuals and families throughout the province of Newfoundland and Labdrador.

Throughout this site you will find information regarding places and products to eat in the province, resources for celiac disease support, and current events and activites of the chapter.

Chapter Executive

  • President: Lisa Dooley
  • Secretary: Judy Kendall
  • Treasurer Alysha Renouf
  • Vice-President: Nancy Dawson
  • Facebook Page Coordinator: Adrianna Smallwood
  • Events Coordinator: Roxanne Kennedy
  • Membership/Privacy/Chapter Email Coordinator: Adrianna Smallwood
  • Newsletter Editor: Mervyn Dean
  • Website Coordinator: Jason Mackey

What is Celiac Disease?

“Celiac disease, also known as celiac sprue, non-tropical sprue, and gluten-sensitive enteropathy, is a condition in
which consuming gluten – a protein found in wheat, rye, barley, and some other grains – leads, in susceptible people,
to damage to the lining of the small intestine, resulting in the inability to properly absorb nutrients into the body. This
can lead to many different symptoms, including fatigue, malaise (feeling generally poorly), bloating, and diarrhoea. Left
untreated or insufficiently treated, celiac disease can lead to damage to other organs. If properly treated, celiac disease
typically leads to….nothing.”

“Diagnosing celiac disease is never that simple. In involves an interview and examination by a physician, and
necessitates investigations typically including blood tests and always having a fiberoptic scope passed through your
mouth, down your esophagus, through your stomach and into your small intestine where a biopsy is then taken.”

From Celiac Disease for Dummies by Ian Blumer, MD and Sheila Crowe, MD.

Living with Celiac Disease

The first step towards health is a visit to your family physician and then a referral to a gastroenterologist for the biopsy.
We must stress that one should not begin a gluten free diet before seeing your doctor – this could lead to a wrong
diagnosis.

The only treatment needed for celiac disease is modifying your diet to eliminate any and all gluten – easily said, but very
difficult to do. The role of the registered dietician is essential here but so is a support group. The NL Chapter
of the Canadian Celiac Association can provide counselling, support, recipes, and information. Additional resources can be found on the national association Web site at www.celiacnl.ca.

Newfoundland and Labrador also has a dedicated gluten free bakery located in Paradise: Nourish. Visit Nourish online at www.nourishnewfoundland.com.